Jenifer Barrirero

Jenifer Barrirero
Argentina
Jenifer started her Ph.D. Studies in September 2012 at Saarland University & Linköping University, the purpose of her work is to elucidate the mechanisms underlying microstructural modification of Al-Si & Al-Si-Mg foundry alloys. She uses characterization methods at different length scales to analyze the distribution of elements in the alloys. The combination of techniques as Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM), Focused Ion Beam Tomography (FIB), Electron Backscattered Diffraction (EBSD) and Energy Dispersive X-ray Spectroscopy (EDX) are some of the methods for the analysis at the micrometer scale. Atom Probe Tomography (APT) and Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM) enables the analysis and understanding of the phenomena that determine microstructure of an alloy.

 

 
Ruth Adriana Carvajal Ortiz

Ruth Adriana Carvajal Ortiz
Colombia
Ruth started her Ph.D. studies on September 2014 at University of Manchester, her research interests include Hydrogen permeability through metals, particularly with regard to problems of hydride formation inside the metal matrix once the hydrogen solubility of the material has been reached. Her principal goal is to design an electrochemical permeation cell called the Devanathan-Stachurski cell in order to measure the diffusion coefficient at hydrothermal conditions of several types of steels, and the effects of the oxide layers formed during corrosion reactions. The electrochemical cell above mentioned has been successfully applied to calculate the diffusion coefficient of different metals up to 90°C. The design to be proposed might be functional at temperatures between 200-450°C, and later applied to work at higher pressures.

 

 
Cristian Perez Brokate

Cristian Perez Brokate
Colombia
Cristian has a Post-Master in Materials, his Ph.D. in Analytical Electrochemistry and Numerical Modeling started on November 2013 at Université Pierre et Marie Curie. His primary interest lies in corrosion field, he will explore the competition of localized and generalized corrosion using numerical simulations with cellular automata to predict the evolution of corrosion at a mesoscopic scale. This approach is adapted to model the stochastic properties of corrosion but also other physico-chemical phenomena that cannot be satisfactorily described by common deterministic and macroscopic methods.

 

 
Omar Iracheta Cabrera

Omar Iracheta Cabrera
Mexico
Omar started his Ph.D. studies on October 2013 at University of Nottingham, his research interests are the development of a fully coupled thermo-mechanical finite element model capable of predicting the evolution of the residual stress field in aeroengine drive shafts during the inertia friction welding process, in order to provide an assessment tool of the structural integrity of the component during service. The model accounts for elastic and inelastic components of strain resulting from mechanical deformation, temperature changes and volumetric changes associated with phase transformations. Experimental weld trials are studied through material characterization of the heat affected zone in order to provide both an understanding of the effects of the process on the material and also information to guide the development of the material database used for the finite element model. An inverse analysis of the nanoindentation test by the finite element approach is developed in order to extract the elastic-plastic material properties of each of the present phases in the heat-affected zone of the shaft.

 

 
Jose Manuel Naranjo Espinosa

Jose Manuel Naranjo Espinosa
Mexico
José has a master in Aerospace Materials, he started his Ph.D. studies on January 2014 at University Of Sheffield. He have worked on a project called “Influence of deoxidation practice and casting route on non-metallic inclusions and their effect on mechanical properties of low alloy steel”. The aim is to develop a proposal for a new method to further control non-metallic inclusions considering both deoxidation practice and casting processes in order to improve the mechanical properties of steel components. This will contribute to the development of materials technologically capable of meeting critical requirements such as the combination of high strength and high toughness - actual problems of the exploration of Oil & Gas fields in deeper waters -considering the aggressive conditions of subsea environments including high pressures and sub-zero temperature.

 

 
Gregorio Solís Bravo

Gregorio Solís Bravo
Mexico
Gregorio has a Master in Science of Materials Science and Engineering and started his Ph.D. in Materials Science on August 2015 at University of Pittsburgh. His principal research interests are Micro-alloyed high strength steels, high strength-low alloy steels, thermo-mechanical processing of steels, modern steels and steel product failure analysis and prevention.

 

 
José Francisco Bolivar Viña

José Francisco Bolivar Viña
Venezuela
José started his Ph.D. Studies on April 2014 at the Institut National des Sciences Appliquées de Lyon focused on the study the behavior of cracks colonies (multiple cracking) generated by stress corrosion cracking in primary circuit conditions of nuclear reactors (350 °C and 150 bars). The principal objective of this research is to enhance the current models, used in the prediction of remnant life of those structures, taking into account the interactions existing in the propagation process of multiple cracking (hitherto ignored) and the synergic effects between electrochemical states and mechanical solicitations of the crack tip.

 

 

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